Teen THC Literacy Quiz

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO TAKE THE QUIZ or click HERE. The questions and answers, with links to the research, are all listed below as well. Enjoy!

  1. What’s the difference between cannabis and THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol)?
    a. They’re the same.
    b. THC is psychoactive, but cannabis isn’t.
    c. THC is more powerful than cannabis.
    d. THC is the psychoactive chemical found in cannabis plants.
  1. What’s the difference between cannabis and marijuana?
    a. They’re the same.
    b. Cannabis refers to the genus of flowering plant, whereas marijuana refers to all cannabis species containing greater than .3% THC.
    c. Marijuana contains only THC, but cannabis contains only CBD (cannabidiol), which isn’t psychoactive.
    d. None of the above.
  1. What’s the difference between cannabis and hemp?
    a. Hemp plants are legal in all 50 states.
    b. Hemp refers to all cannabis species containing less than .3% THC.
    c. All hemp is cannabis, but not all cannabis is hemp.
    d. CBD from hemp plants can be synthesized in a lab to make delta-8-THC, which is psychoactive.
    e. All of these answers.
  1. What is dabbing?
    a. A dance move
    b. Cleaning up spilled vape juice
    c. Heating and inhaling the vapors of a concentrated THC product
  1. The amount of THC in dabs can be:
    a. 25%
    b. Up to 60%
    c. Up to 90%
    d. 100%
  1. Compared to the 1980s, the current THC levels in marijuana flower are on average:
    a. 5% lower
    b. 13% higher
    c. 26% higher
    d. 200% percent higher
  1. Which of the following can be caused by THC use?
    a. Anxiety
    b. Paranoia
    c. Psychosis
    d. Agitation
    e. All of these mental states
  1. Which form of marijuana use can cause long-term damage to your lungs?
    a. Smoking
    b. Vaping
    c. Dabbing
    d. All of these uses
  1. True or false? There are fewer health risks with taking edibles than smoking cannabis.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. What’s the most widely used form of THC?
    a. Herb (bud/weed)
    b. Concentrates (dabs)
    c. Hash oil (vapes)
    d. None of these forms
  1. What hormone does THC release in your body?
    a. Oxytocin
    b. Somatostatin
    c. Prolactin
    d. Dopamine
    e. Estrogen
  1. Which is a short-term side effect of THC?
    a. Dry mouth
    b. Red eyes
    c. Memory loss
    d. Issues with coordination
    e. All of these effects
  1. The molecular structure of THC is similar to ________, which occurs in the body naturally.
    a. Testosterone
    b. Anandamide
    c. Carotene
    d. None of these natural substances
  1. The effects of an edible can last up to __ hours.
    a. 24
    b. 4
    c. 8
    d. 72
  1. Marijuana can cause:
    a. Harm to brain health, especially in adolescents
    b. Vomiting spells
    c. An increased risk of stroke
    d. An increased risk of heart attack
    e. All of these medical issues
  1. True or false? Medical and recreational marijuana have the same effects on the brain.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. True or false? If you use marijuana frequently, you could become addicted to it.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. True or false? Marijuana is safe because it comes from a plant.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. True or false? Because marijuana is legal in some states, it’s okay for teens to use and doesn’t have any harmful effects.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. One difference between smoking marijuana and tobacco is:
    a. Marijuana increases the risk of heart attacks, and tobacco doesn’t.
    b. Tobacco increases the risk of strokes, and marijuana doesn’t.
    c. Marijuana can lead to psychosis, and tobacco doesn’t.
  1. Delta-8 THC is:
    a. A safer alternative to marijuana
    b. An unregulated substance found in cannabis that doesn’t cause psychosis
    c. Banned in some U.S. states but sold in convenience stores in other states; it’s not required to be sold in dispensaries in states where it’s legal.
  1. As many as 30% of cases of schizophrenia among men aged 21–30 could have been averted had they simply not used marijuana.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. Marijuana is associated with an increased risk of developing these serious mental health disorders:
    a. Generalized anxiety disorder
    b. Bipolar disorder
    c. Schizophrenia
    d. All of these disorders
  1. True or false? Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) results from long-term marijuana use and leads to cycles of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. True or false? No one has died from outcomes related to THC use.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. How many daily marijuana users develop an addiction to it?
    a. None. Marijuana isn’t addictive.
    b. Up to 9%
    c. Up to 50%
    d. Up to 72%
  1. True or false? Your risk of addiction increases with higher potency marijuana.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. Some childhood forms of epilepsy have successfully been treated with:
    a. THC
    b. CBD
    c. A mix of both
  1. True or false? Your fertility rates can drop if you use marijuana.
    a. True
    b. False
  1. How is marijuana related to depression?
    a. Marijuana has no connection to depression.
    b. Marijuana makes symptoms of depression easier to deal with.
    c. Marijuana increases the risk of developing depression.

ANSWER KEY

  1. D — THC is the psychoactive chemical found in cannabis plants. See the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health’s guide to cannabis and cannabinoids.
  2. B — Cannabis refers to a genus of flowering plant, whereas marijuana refers to all cannabis species containing greater than .3% THC. See the Yale School of Medicine’s article about about rising THC concentrations in marijuana.
  3. E — All of these answers. Hemp plants, which contain less than .3% THC, are legal across the United States, and all are forms of cannabis. However, not all cannabis is hemp because some plants contain more than .3% THC, which are called marijuana plants. Hemp can also be converted to the psychoactive delta-8 THC.
  4. C — Heating and inhaling the vapors of a concentrated THC product. Dabbing refers to heating and inhaling a “dab” (a tiny bit) of concentrated THC. The THC concentration in dabs is very high.
  5. C — Up to 90%. Concentrated forms of marijuana have a very high potency, from 60%–90%, and some can be even higher. Taking a dab today is the same as smoking 50 joints from the 1960s.
  6. C — 26% higher. In the 1980s, marijuana flower on average contained 2% THC. That average jumped to 28% in 2017. Today’s marijuana plants are much stronger than the plants of decades past and can be 40% THC and even higher.
  7. E — All of these mental states. Based on a 2021 study published in Nursing, high-potency THC substances are more likely to cause anxiety, agitation, paranoia, and psychosis.
  8. D — All of these uses. Smoking, vaping, and dabbing marijuana all release toxins and cancer-causing substances that can harm lungs and lead to bronchitis or even lung infections. A 2017 study published in ACS Omega from the American Chemical Society found that dabs contain several dangerous cancer-causing substances, like benzene.
  9. B — False. All forms of THC are bad for teens; however, in some cases, edibles can pose a greater danger to health. A 2019 study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that between 2012 and 2016, 9,973 people visited the emergency department of a hospital in Colorado for cannabis use. Although more people visited because of inhalation rather than because of edibles, those who came because of edibles were more likely to display serious symptoms like psychosis and problems related to the heart and blood vessels.
  10. C — Herbs (bud/weed). THC comes in three common forms: herb (bud/weed), concentrates (dabs), and oils (vapes). The herbal variety is the most popular. It’s made from dried marijuana leaves and flowers, or buds. Dabs and vapes have much higher THC levels than buds.
  11. D — Dopamine. THC in marijuana stimulates the parts of your brain that respond to pleasure. It also releases your body’s “feel good” hormone dopamine, which often causes a relaxed, euphoric feeling. However, a 2016 study published in Nature showed that regular use eventually leads to a reduction in dopamine, which can negatively affect emotions, motivation, and more, like how easily you become addicted to substances.
  12. E — All of the above. Using THC may cause some short-term side effects. With long-term use, you might experience negative psychiatric effects from getting high. According to some research, regular or large doses of THC may be a catalyst for schizophrenia.
  13. B — Anandamide. THC is similar to anandamide, a brain chemical that sends messages to affect physical and mental functions. Because they’re similar, THC can block anandamide receptors and disrupt those messages.
  14. C — 8 hours. The effects of ingested THC can last up to 8 hours. Smoking or vaping can last up to half that time.
  15. E — All of the above. Marijuana can cause harm to brain health and vomiting spells, and it can increase the risk of a stroke or heart attack.

  16. A — True. Recreational and medical marijuana contain the same compounds that can negatively affect the brain, especially those of young adults. Marijuana is marijuana, and the products are the same whether it’s recreational or “medicinal.” Medical marijuana is a tax status, where you can pay less and buy more if you have a “medical” card. The FDA hasn’t approved any THC products (vapes, dabs, edibles) as medicine.
  17. A — True. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) defines cannabis use disorder (CUD) as “a problematic pattern of cannabis use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress,” which means you can’t stop using marijuana even though it’s causing problems in your life.
  18. B — False. Tobacco, opium, and cocaine—like marijuana—are all derived from plants. All are addictive and come with health risks. Just because marijuana is a plant doesn’t mean you can’t develop physical and mental health problems from it.
  19. B — False. Because medical and recreational marijuana are legal in so many states, it may seem safe. But for years, many studies have linked cannabis use to a host of physical and mental health problems. Teens are at an even greater risk. Particularly in the developing brains of adolescents, marijuana has been shown to trigger schizophrenia, psychosis, and depression.
  20. D — Marijuana can lead to psychosis, and tobacco doesn’t. Marijuana and tobacco both increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. However, tobacco doesn’t lead to irreversible psychosis, like marijuana can.
  21. C — Banned in some U.S. states but sold in convenience stores in other states; it’s not required to be sold in dispensaries in states where it’s legal. Delta-8-THC is a psychoactive isomer found in cannabis plants. It can be made from the hemp plant, which is legal under the Farm Act of 2018. It’s now sold in gas stations in some U.S. states, even though it’s unregulated and has been banned in 17 states. Users have experienced adverse effects including psychosis from Delta-8.
  22. A — True. Cannabis use disorder (CUD) is a risk factor in the onset of mental illness, but it can be controlled—just by choosing not to use marijuana. See this 2023 study published in Psychological Medicine.
  23. D — All of these disorders. Marijuana use has been linked to several serious mental health disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.
  24. A — True. Some long-term marijuana users develop cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), which consists of cycles of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. According to Cedars-Sinai, untreated, prolonged CHS can lead to muscle spasms or weakness, seizures, kidney failure, heart rhythm abnormalities, shock, and in rare cases, brain swelling.
  25. B — False. A 2022 study published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship found that between 2014 and 2020, the deaths of 386 people in Florida alone were associated with cannabis and synthetic cannabis use, including accidents and cardiovascular-related illnesses. Cannabis use has also been associated with suicidal ideation and attempts.
  26. C — Up to 50%. A common misconception is that cannabis isn’t addictive. However, some studies have shown that up to 50% of daily marijuana users will become addicted to the drug. Cannabis use disorder (CUD), another name for cannabis addiction, was added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in 2013.
  27. A — True. A 2022 study published in The Lancet found that high-potency marijuana can increase the risk of illness and addiction.
  28. B — CBD. CBD—which doesn’t contain THC, so it doesn’t have psychoactive effects—has reduced seizures in multiple forms of childhood epilepsy. This prescription medication is called Epidiolex.
  29. A — True. Marijuana has been shown to decrease sperm count and delay ovulation.
  30. C — Marijuana increases the risk of developing depression. In a study of 23,217 individuals, adolescents who used marijuana had a significant increased risk of depression and suicidality later in life.

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